1 Easter Egg

Easter Egg Dyeing Technique

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye


MATERIALS
Kinky Yarn 100% Superwash Wool
200 grams / 133 meters / 147 yards

TOOLS
Deep bowl
Easter Egg Dye
Pill Cutter
32oz White vinegar
Towels
Old Towel
Gloves (optional)

Technique

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique


Open Easter Egg dye packets on dry surface. We used 3 packets of PAAS deluxe, which contained 9 different tablets.

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique


Uncoil the Kinky Yarn and divide it into sections equal to the number of dye tablets. We attempted to arrange the dye tablets in rainbow order using the colors of the tablets. Turns out the colors are not all accurate in tablet form. If you’d like the rainbow to be in correct order, test each color by touching a tablet to a moist white paper towel. You’ll then see the color of the dye, instead of just the color of the tablet.

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique


Use a pill cutter to divide tablets in half. Alternatively, use a sharp knife and cutting board. Be careful not to cut yourself and watch for flying dye pill bits!

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique


Lay out the pill pieces onto the coil of yarn, and put them into the coil by slipping them through a stitch. At this point, these pill bits can shuffle around, so handle your Kinky Yarn carefully.

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique
Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique


Fill a large container with cold water, and add 1/4th of the vinegar. Stir to combine.

Carefully submerge Kinky Yarn into bath. We laid it in starting with one end and slowly laying the coil in until it was all in the water/vinegar mixture.
IMPORTANT: Do not move yarn now. Allow the tablets to dissolve.

Kinky Yarn Easter Egg Dye Technique


Allow the dye to dissolve. The water will become dark with dye (ours turned blue/green). Once you think the tablets have all dissolved, sit container in a bath or kitchen sink, and turn on the cold water. Allow the water to overflow until water runs clear. You may want to pour out all the current water and allow the container to fill up again.

Once the water runs clear, squeeze all water out of the Kinky Yarn. Roll in an absorbent towel (We used an old one in case any dye transferred), then hang to dry.

https://www.makersmercantile.com/shop/Yarn/Kinky-Yarn/p/Kinky-Yarn-Dyeing-Technique-Easter-Egg-Dye-Tablets-x40083340.htm


Admire your beautiful and one of a kind Kinky Yarn!

Fringe Benefit

Fringe Benefit

Have dyed your Kinky Yarn using Easter Egg Dye or by using some other technique?  Looking for a project?  Introducing the Fringe Benefit Shawl designed for Maker's Mercantile by Katie Rempe of Kater Tater Knits.

This quick and easy shawl is a great weekend project!

While this design can be made without fringe, we highly recommend them. 

Kinky Yarn Fringe Benefit Shawl

1 Fridays with Franklin: I Get Kinky

Fridays with Franklin Logo

For an introduction to what goes on in this column, click here.

I get the darnedest stuff in the mail from Makers’ Mercantile. The latest box was preceded by a note that said, “I’m send you something kinky.”

I’m not a prude, but that did give me pause.

What arrived in the mail was yarn. Oddly packaged yarn. I’ve had yarn in skeins and balls; but this arrived as two neat little cakes.

Two new cakes of Kinky Yarn.
The only yarn I’ve ever seen that includes the word “badass” on the tag.

Cute, right? Turns out this is a new yarn, and it’s called Kinky. And you buy it in a cake. It looks like this.

The cake is plain, and that’s the point. The note enclosed said that decorating a cake of Kinky is step one before using it. Decorate it with what? Just about anything, apparently. Dye, paint, markers–whatever will leave permanent mark on the fiber–it’s 100% superwash wool.

Which explained why these were also in the box.

Marabu Textil and Marabu Fashion Spray
Interesting…

I’m not a dyer, and I admit that on the list of things you can do with yarn, dyeing it is way down my list. We all have our limits; that’s one of mine.

I’ve dabbled in dyeing, and the process reminds me of the fishing trips I was forced to endure as a child. You drop in the string, and you wait. And wait. And wait. And wait. And wait. Then you pull the string out and see what you got.

Just not my cup of tea.

But this was different. The Kinky Yarn cake is made up of a knitted tube, rolled and tied. The instructions suggested that I could unroll and decorate it, or not.

I decided to leave the cake intact. That way it would feel less like dyeing, and more like putting the finishing touches on a fancy dessert.

For cake one, I pulled out a paint brush and a couple bottles of Textil Marabu textile paint. This stuff looks like poster paint and acts like it, too–it’s got the same consistency. But instead of using it to announce a bake sale or the drama club’s production of Glengarry Glen Ross, you use it to paint fiber or fabric.

This was, wonder of wonders, fun. It didn’t take long for me to have this little cutie sitting on my work table.

Kinky Yarn cake painted with Textil Marabu paints.
Note the foil-covered surface. Also, I was wearing one of daddy’s old shirts as a paint smock.

This would be neat way of getting the kiddies involved in your fiber work, if you can trust the kiddies with paint or markers. Put on the smocks, cover the table, and let them go to town. Keeping an eye on them, of course. Then knit, weave or crochet with what they’ve created.

Sort of be a fun gift to a knitter or crocheter, too. Paint it up for them with Bon Voyage, Happy Birthday, or a portrait of the cat. Or put out one for each guest at yarn lover’s party, with markers and paints for decorating in the center of the table.

For the other Kinky cake, I used Fashion Spray Marabu, which comes in a little spritz bottle. Unlike Textil Marabu, which is pretty thick, Fashion Spray Marabu is what the name suggests–a spray.

Word to the wise: when you press the nozzle the first time to test it, aim it a scrap of paper or cloth. Like this.

Test spray on paper towel.
Pfffffffffffffffft…

Do not, I repeat do not, accidentally aim the nozzle at your face. I learned that the hard way. There is no photograph, because I was busy going ack ack gah cough ack while wondering if I were now Permanently Smurfed.

The spray was super fun. Spritz here, spritz there. I used two colors, and had a good time applying them over each other and watching how they blended where they touched.

Kinky Yarn cake sprayed with Fashion Spray Marabu.
Good enough to eat.

I let both cakes dry thoroughly, which is also recommend for Kinky. Only after it’s dry do you undo the cake, unravel the tube, and wind the dyed yarn into a ball. The yarn will be kinked–therefore the name. The kinks can be left in, to add interest to your fabric. Or, if you don’t like the kinks, block the finished piece and they disappear.

After drying, I was pleased with the appearance of both cakes, but checked the spray version and noted that of course the spray liquid hadn’t penetrated far beyond the surface.

The untouched interior of the yarn cake.

That’s part of the fun of the knitted cake structure; it means some parts of the fiber are likely to remain untouched and produce unexpected effects–sort of like the game you play whentie-dyeing t-shirts. But I didn’t want this much of my cake to stay white. So I did one more thing.

I took what was left of my blue fashion spray and diluted it with enough water to allow me to dip half the cake into it. There I let it stand for a few hours.

Then I took out the cake, and prepared a similar bath with the remains of the purple spray. I dipped the other half and let it stand for a few hours.

Kinky Yarn cake half submerged in dye bath.
Exciting action shot.

Next time, I’ll show you what sort of yarn I got from each cake, and knit some up to check out the results.

See you in two weeks…

Tools and Materials Appearing in This Issue

Kinky Yarn (100% superwash wool)
Textil Marabu fabric paint
Fashion Spray Marabu textile spray paint

About Franklin

Designer, teacher, author and illustrator Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008). His newest book, I Dream of Yarn: A Knit and Crochet Coloring Book was brought out by Soho Publishing.

He travels constantly to teach knitters at shops and guilds across the country and internationally; and has been a popular member of the faculties of such festivals as Vogue Knitting Live!, STITCHES Events, the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Squam Arts Workshops, the Taos Wool Festival, Sock Summit, and the Madrona Fiber Arts Winter Retreat.

Franklin’s varied experience in the fiber world includes contributions of writing and design to Vogue Knitting, Yarn Market News, Interweave Knits, Interweave Crochet, PieceWork, Twist Collective; and a regular columns and cartoons for Mason-Dixon Knitting, PLY Magazine, Lion Brand Yarns, and Skacel Collection/Makers’ Mercantile. Many of his independently published designs are available via Ravelry.com.

He is the longtime proprietor of The Panopticon, one of the most popular knitting blogs on the Internet (presently on hiatus).

Franklin lives in Chicago, Illinois, cohabiting shamelessly with 15,000 books, a Schacht spinning wheel, four looms, and a colony of yarn that multiplies whenever his back is turned.

Follow Franklin online via Twitter (@franklinhabit), Instagram (@franklin.habit), his Web site (franklinhabit.com) or his Facebook page.

5 Cable Channel – Knit Along

Michelle Hunter's "Cable Channel"  Pillow Knit-Along ...
Featuring HiKoo's Kenzie Yarn

Michelle's (a.k.a. Knit-Purl-Hunter) newest KAL is a stylish pillow featuring an original cable pattern!

Michelle's knit alongs (KALs) are mystery knit alongs. So there are no preliminary photos ... all we know is that the finished pillow is one size about 14" square and will feature an original cable pattern.   If history has teaches us anything this design will be amazing!

Pillows provide the perfect platform to explore new techniques and hone the finishing skills.  All of the techniques Michelle uses will be supported by her video tutorials and she answers questions daily on her website and Knit Purl Hunter Ravelry group. Michelle's instructions, tutorials and videos have made her KALs extremely popular ... think of her KAL as an online class, worth far more than the price of admission — which is, of course, Free!!

The KAL is FREE and Skacel is sponsoring a drawing for one grand prize and two second place prizes. Here is more information on prizes, a contest overview and how to enter!

The Cable Channel Pillow Knit-Along started Thursday, April 4th, 2019.  Get your supplies now!

Project

"Cable Channel" Pillow - featuring HiKoo's Kenzie yarn

"Cable Channel" Pillow
by Michelle Hunter
Free pattern posted progressively during the Knit-Along

Cable Channel is knit in one piece with simple seaming and features a button closure to allow for easy washing and assembly. The front and back are knit in different stitch patterns to keep the project interesting and texturally charming. The pattern has both written and charted instructions, along with video support ... you are guaranteed success!

Schedule

Segment

Date

First

April 4, 2019

Second

April 11, 2019

Third

April 18, 2019

Fourth

April 25, 2019

The pattern will be released in four weekly installments. Each Thursday the next part of the pattern is revealed. Thus the mystery! This KAL started at 9 am on Thursday, April 4th and continues on the 11th, 18th and 25th.

The pattern and videos will be available at KnitPurlHunter.com/KAL and remember to connect with other knitters on Knit Purl Hunter's Ravelry group.  The video lessons along with the forums let knitters of all skill levels participate ... it's like having a knitting tutor 24/7!

Materials

Materials

4 x HiKoo's Kenzie.  Shown in #1024 Hokitika

Finished Sizes

One Size: 14” square

Needles

US 6 [4.00mm] 24" circular needles or size needed to obtain gauge

Gauge

23 sts and 30 rows = 4" in stockinette, blocked

Buttons

4 x 7/8" (23MM) buttons - Shown in Skacel coconut button #BU1732C23

Notions

1 x 14” pillow form and 1 x Cable Needle

Skill Level

Beginner

Yarn

HiKoo's "Kenzie" yarn is a fun New Zealand creation. This soft and slightly fuzzy yarn features a wonderfully unique blend of fibers and has good stitch definition. It's available in over 25 splendid colorways ... there is a shade to match every décor or provide that perfect “pop” of color. 

Fiber Content

50% New Zealand Merino Wool, 25% Nylon, 10% Angora, 10% Alpaca, 5% Silk Noils

Yardage / Weight

160 yards per 50 gram ball

Gauge

Approximately 20 sts = 4 inches on US 6 (4.00 mm) needles

Care Instructions

Hand Wash, Dry Flat

Buttons

We all have the tendency to want the button in the pictures ... but wait!

 With over 25 colors of Kenzie and a wide selection of Skacel buttons available it's easy to find just the right combination of yarn and buttons.  View our "Button Suggestions" for buttons to match to every color of the fabulous Kenzie yarn!

Fridays with Franklin: Nineteenth Century Knit-Along, Part Three

For an introduction to what goes on in this column, click here.

For the previous installment (Week Two) of the knit-along, click here.

Here we are in Week Four, the final week of our Nineteenth Century Knit-Along. We need to cap our project with its final edging.

Before that, though, let me tell you some more about what you’ve been working on.

The designer of the piece is Jane Gaugain, one of the most important figures in the history of knitting. She has often been called, and with reason, the mother of fiber arts publishing. Okay, I’ve called her that a lot.

Here’s why.

Jane Gaugain (born Jane Alison, in the early 19th century) was a Scotswoman who was born into a tailoring family and married an Edinburgh haberdasher.

After her marriage, she went to work in the family firm, and was instrumental in turning it into a thriving operation. Among the lines sold from the Gaugains’ premises were needlework supplies, including fine, gorgeously dyed merino yarns from Germany that became known in the English speaking world as “Berlin wools.”

Jane realized that to sell more wool yarns, she needed to provide her customers with knitting patterns–and so in the 1830s she began to distribute them. A subscription volume (a sort of forerunner of the Kickstarter) of mixed patterns in the late 1830s proved so popular that in 1840 she published an expanded version of it entitled, The Lady’s Assistant in Knitting, Netting, and Crochet.

For more about Jane, I highly recommend Kate Davies’ excellent article “In the Steps of Jane Gaugain.

It’s The Lady’s Assistant from which our pattern was taken, albeit in an adapted form. I was thrilled to tears (no exaggeration–I cried) to find my copy (the later edition of 1846) on a trip to Cambridge, England, in a shop that let it go for a reasonable price because it was outside their specialty.

gaugain-book-cover.jpg
gaugain-book-titlepage.jpg

The original name of the pattern was “Pyrenees Knit Scarf,” and the original differed in several respects from our modern version.

• It was wider. The cast on was 125 stitches.

• It was done in multiple colors. Mrs. Gaugain specifies white and blue.

• It was longer. The suggested length was “about two yards and a half.”

• And it had tassels. The finishing included “drawing up at both ends, and attaching a tassel thereto.”

The pattern called for Berlin wool, but a note at the end suggests “glover’s silk” as an alternative–this being a yarn in a weight similar to that of the Berlin wool, but spun from (did you guess?) silk.

Jane was a pioneer in committing to the printed page what had most often before that been passed along directly from knitter to knitter, by spoken word and demonstration.

Her quick mind and gift for organization are evident from the first. She made handy use of abbreviations (using existing type–so that, for example, a symbol for a knitted decrease could be inverted to indicate the purl version of that decrease). She organized many of her more complex patterns row by row.

And although it certainly could not be said to be charted, there is a hint at charts to come in the way the Pyrenees Scarf pattern is laid out on the page.

Here it is, in full, as printed in my copy.

original-pattern-01

original-pattern-02

original-pattern-03.jpg

Finishing Your Scarf

Once you’ve finished the Final Edging, you’ll want to wet block your scarf. Otherwise, no matter how lovely your knitting has been the thing is going to look like a very large and elegantly dyed length of crumpled toilet paper.

Pretty much all knitted lace requires blocking, but lace with patterning on every row requires it especially. I wondered how much of a trial this was going to be. I love the results of blocking lace, but I won’t tell you the process makes me jump for joy.

Here’s what I did, and what I recommend you do.

1. Fill a perfectly clean receptacle (this may be a large bowl, a sink, a washtub, or any such thing) with tepid, clear water. If you like (I like) put in a dollop of a gentle soap like baby shampoo or a purpose made wash like Soak (available from Makers’ Mercantile).

2. Gently swish the soap into the water. You don’t need to make suds. Suds are annoying.

3.  Put your scarf gently into the water and press it down below the surface. Let it soak there for at least an hour. Two wouldn’t be amiss.

4. Once the scarf has had a nice bath, remove it from the water. Wet lace will stretch under its own weight, so support it as you lift. Imagine it’s a baby. Or a puppy. Whichever you’d rather hold.

5. Squeeze it gently to remove the excess water. It should be damp, but not sopping.

6. If you haven’t used a no-rinse product like Soak, rinse the piece in a bowl of clear water. Then remove and squeeze, as above. Otherwise, go right to the next step.

7. Now, here’s the beautiful thing. Most lace needs to be pinned out while damp. Jane Gaugain doesn’t specify pinning. In fact, she says nothing about blocking at all. What I found, to my delight, is that the wet Infinito expanded (as superwash wools like to do) under its own weight.

All I did was lay it out flat on a smooth surface, and gently smooth and pat it to the finished dimensions. I used a yardstick to make sure it was square from and even from end to end.

Had I pinned it, it would be a little longer and little wider, and a bit more open. But I was so happy with the un-pinned results that I didn’t bother. I just left it there (in my case, on a little-used kitchen island on a couple of clean towels) until it was mostly dry.

Then of course we needed to use the kitchen island, so while the knitting was still a little damp I draped it over the shower curtain rod in the guest bath.

If you aren’t using Infinito, you may want to pin your piece out. Soak it, lay it out without pins, and see what you think.

Given that we wanted to keep this project within the bounds of one skein, I didn’t elect to gather-and-tassel as prescribed. If you’d like to try that, and/or to try another scarf closer to Mrs. Gaugain’s original vision, I’d love to see what you do.

The Pattern

Enjoy the complete version of the Nineteenth Century Knit-Along scarf pattern by either updating to the latest version on Ravelry HERE, or by downloading the complete pattern via the Makers’ Mercantile website:

downloadnowbutton

Here ends our knit-along. I thank you for coming to play with us. Would you like to do this again? What shall we do next? Post your suggestions in the Ravelry group…

Tools and Materials Appearing in This Issue

Zitron Infinito (100% extra fine merino, 550 yards [500m] per 100g hank), shown in Colorway 2
Soak Wool Wash

About Franklin

Designer, teacher, author and illustrator Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008). His newest book, I Dream of Yarn: A Knit and Crochet Coloring Book was brought out by Soho Publishing in May 2016 and is in its second printing.

He travels constantly to teach knitters at shops and guilds across the country and internationally; and has been a popular member of the faculties of such festivals as Vogue Knitting Live!, STITCHES Events, the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Squam Arts Workshops, the Taos Wool Festival, Sock Summit, and the Madrona Fiber Arts Winter Retreat.

Franklin’s varied experience in the fiber world includes contributions of writing and design to Vogue Knitting, Yarn Market News, Interweave Knits, Interweave Crochet, PieceWork, Twist Collective; and a regular columns and cartoons for Mason-Dixon Knitting, PLY Magazine, Lion Brand Yarns, and Skacel Collection/Makers’ Mercantile. Many of his independently published designs are available via Ravelry.com.

He is the longtime proprietor of The Panopticon, one of the most popular knitting blogs on the Internet (presently on hiatus).

Franklin lives in Chicago, Illinois, cohabiting shamelessly with 15,000 books, a Schacht spinning wheel, four looms, and a colony of yarn that multiplies whenever his back is turned.

Follow Franklin online via Twitter (@franklinhabit), Instagram (@franklin.habit), his Web site (franklinhabit.com) or his Facebook page.

1 Fridays with Franklin: Nineteenth Century Knit-Along, Part Two

fwf-logo-columnsizeWelcome to Part Two of our Nineteenth Century Knit-Along!

I hope you’ve had fun with the Beginning Edging. If you’re just tuning it, you’ll find it here.

Your work in that section will have prepared you very well for our next stage: the center.

 

The center section contains by far the most knitting, so we’re allotting two full weeks to it.

kal-lace-center

Before you charge forward, I’d like to offer some tips for success.

Count Your Stitches

The number of stitches is the same in all rows. Get into the good habit of stopping every so often to count how many you have. It isn’t difficult to think you’re moving along perfectly, only to find that you’ve accidentally eliminated or added a stitch or two. Usually, the culprit is a missed decrease or a missed yarn over.

If you count, say, every ten rows or–better still–every five rows, you can catch the error in time to save yourself a great deal of ripping out.

Use Lifelines

It’s seldom advisable, when ripping out lace is necessary, to simply pull out the needle and rip. Especially in work like this, with yarn overs on every row, the fabric will collapse like a house of cards.

My advice?

Stop regularly, every ten rows or so, and put in a lifeline.

This is simple to do.

First, cut yourself a nice length (about 20 inches will do) of a smooth yarn that looks nothing like your Infinito colorway. As to weight, I prefer something pretty hefty–worsted or DK would be lovely. Fiber content doesn’t matter much, so long as the yarn isn’t sticky–so stay away from mohair, angora, and the like.Thread this scrap yarn onto a tapestry needle.

Once you have counted your stitches and made sure the row of live stitches currently on the needle is complete and correct, run the scrap yarn through every one of those live stitches (EVERY one) including yarn overs.

Make sure, once you’ve done that, that you have a nice amount of scrap yarn tail hanging on either side of the work, so the natural movement of the knitting won’t cause your lifeline to slip out. Some knitters like to tie the ends of their lifelines in a simple knot to secure them. I don’t. It’s up to you.

I demonstrate putting in a lifeline in this handy video:

What’s the lifeline for? Well, if you have to rip out a section, you can remove the needle and rip back to the lifeline row. It may save time, as opposed to un-knitting stitch by stitch.

Take Care in Un-Knitting

If (and when) you do need to un-knit, keep in mind how a decrease was made when you set about undoing it. You need to
reverse that process.

So, for example, to work a left purl decrease (lpd), we do this:

Purl the first stitch, move the yarn to the back of the work, and return (slipping as if to purl) the stitch to the left needle; pass the next stitch over the purled stitch, and return the stitch to right needle. 

To undo that lpd, we:

Move yarn to the back of the work; pass the decrease stitch to the left needle; pick up the passed-over stitch with the right needle tip and carry it right to left it over the purl stitch. Return the the purled stitch to the right needle, move the yarn to the front of the work, and un-purl the stitch.

I’ve prepared a video of this, for those who would like to see the process in action. Don’t be afraid of it, embrace it. You’ll need it at some point in this adventure.

It takes a bit of thought and practice. You can do it. Keep calm. 

And now, part two of the pattern: The Center. Since there is so much ground to cover with this portion, the final installment will be posted two weeks from today.

Get the latest version of the pattern HERE. You’ll find the instructions for the center on page two, under the heading “Center.” They’re quite concise. You’ll see…


Tools and Materials Appearing in This Issue

Zitron Infinito (100% extra fine merino, 550 yards [500m] per 100g hank), shown in Colorway 2

Maker’s Mercantile Tapestry Needles (Set of Five)

About Franklin

Designer, teacher, author and illustrator Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008). His newest book, I Dream of Yarn: A Knit and Crochet Coloring Book was brought out by Soho Publishing in May 2016 and is in its second printing.

He travels constantly to teach knitters at shops and guilds across the country and internationally; and has been a popular member of the faculties of such festivals as Vogue Knitting Live!, STITCHES Events, the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Squam Arts Workshops, the Taos Wool Festival, Sock Summit, and the Madrona Fiber Arts Winter Retreat.

Franklin’s varied experience in the fiber world includes contributions of writing and design to Vogue Knitting, Yarn Market News, Interweave Knits, Interweave Crochet, PieceWork, Twist Collective; and a regular columns and cartoons for Mason-Dixon Knitting, PLY Magazine, Lion Brand Yarns, and Skacel Collection/Makers’ Mercantile. Many of his independently published designs are available via Ravelry.com.

He is the longtime proprietor of The Panopticon, one of the most popular knitting blogs on the Internet (presently on hiatus).

Franklin lives in Chicago, Illinois, cohabiting shamelessly with 15,000 books, a Schacht spinning wheel, four looms, and a colony of yarn that multiplies whenever his back is turned.

Follow Franklin online via Twitter (@franklinhabit), Instagram (@franklin.habit), his Web site (franklinhabit.com) or his Facebook page.

 

2 Speckled Hat

Speckled Hat

Fling Cowl

Fling Cowl

Each Kinky Yarn project is two projects in one. First, the fiber is dyed, and then it is knitted (or crocheted, or woven... the possibilities are endless! In this project, Kyle experimented with dyeing the yarn in its coil.

The Fling Cowl uses an easy knit/purl stitch that allows the color shifts to shine through. This project requires knitting knowledge including cast on, knit/purl, working in the round, and bind off; all on circular needles. Follow the links below to download the pattern and tutorial, and gather the supplies needed to make your own version of this cowl. Post 

2 Kinky Techniques

Kinky Techniques

Experimenting is part of the fun! Check out some of the different ways we have dyed Kinky Yarn!


Sharpie Marker Dyeing

  • Just the Facts
  • Longer, Bantier Version


Speckled Yarn Dyeing


The Kinky Yarn

What is "Kinky Yarn"

This super fun yarn is all kinky and ready for fun! It arrives to you like this: a 12-stitch knitted tube of superwash wool is rolled into a coil and is just begging to be dyed. Read our fun poem and be inspired. 

100% Superwash Wool
200g / 133 meters / 147 yards
12-16 sts and 20-22 rows = 4" on US 10-13
(6.0 - 9.0 mm) needles

We invite you to experiment! Add color with conventional dye.. or paint... OR get curious! What would happen if you soaked Kinky Yarn in a tray of red wine? Red wine stains, right? Does it dye yarn?

How about Easter egg dye tablets? Would they disperse color if poked between the coils? 

Hmmm. What happens if you use Sharpie markers and then soak the yarn with rubbing alcohol? 

Answer these questions and many more with us as we explore the possibilities with Kinky Yarn. 

Wait!
You may first uncoil it,
but premature unraveling
could definitely spoil it.

Speckle it with a brush,
or dip it in some dye,
have a little fun; don't be shy.

Now, it's time to unravel,
(no, it's not a sin),
just be sure you knit
those kinks right in.

Wear your finished attire
with confidence and sass,
knowing you and your custom
piece, are totally badass.

>
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