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January 2020 Knit Along with Franklin Habit

Winter Sapphire: A New Curious Knit-Along with Franklin Habit 

Makers’ Mercantile is pleased to announce the next Curious Knit-Along with Franklin Habit: Winter Sapphire. This simple but fascinating piece was inspired by the unusual construction of a bordered, triangular scarf first published in the 1840s. It’s worked neither from the top down nor from the bottom up–but from tip to tip. And in one piece! But this is no copy from the antique. Franklin has added not only texture–but color, blending two colorways of yarn for added depth. Closely related colorways will shimmer. More radical pairings will positively vibrate. Makers’ Mercantile will provide the perfect yarn–Zitron’s La Vie, a dazzlingly variegated blend of extrafine Merino, silk, and Tencel. It drapes and drapes and drapes; and when knit on the bias, as in the Winter Sapphire, it drapes even more. It’s soft enough to warm and comfort even a sensitive neck.  

Project

As always, our Curious Knit-Alongs are designed for the knitter who is looking to learn a little bit more about the history of knitting, the structure of knitted fabrics, and techniques they may not yet have encountered. All this, plus the fellowship of a friendly and supportive group moderated by the designer.

The KAL begins January 3rd, and the adventure will continue for the entire month of January, 2020.

Join the Knit-Along and spend time with other makers in the forum. Franklin will add witty instruction and guideance as the KAL progresses through the month of January. If the kits have sold out, or if you'd like to use different colors or yarn, use the links below to purchase kit components (while supplies last).

Materials

Materials

Zitron La Vie -

Color A - 3 balls

Color B - 2 balls

Finished Size

50" across long edge, 38" on each short side

Needles

addi® Rocket US 4 (3.50mm) 24” (60cm) long circular needle, or size needed to obtain gauge.

Gauge

20 sts and 40 rows = 4” in garter stitch

Notions

Yarn

Fiber Content

30% Extrafine Merino Wool

30% Silk

40% Tencel

Yardage / Weight

136 yards / 125 meters per 5- gram ball

Gauge

3.0-3.5 mm needles

7.5-8 sts per inch

Care Instructions

Hand wash, dry flat

Fannie Breaking

Eat, Knit and Dye

Sometimes when I am dyeing yarn I have a plan. Sometimes I have no idea what I am doing. Sometimes I just make it up as I go. This is one of those occasions. And spoiler alert: I am so enraptured with this colorway. Hold on to your horses, and let’s see what happened!

I’m using Fannie this week. I like the crispness of this 100% Superwash Merino Wool. It coordinates nicely with Zitron Lifestyle yarn.

As I was preparing for a day of yarn dyeing, I was tying the hanks with bindings so they don’t get all tangled. On this one, I decided to do something weird. I folded the hank in half and tied it into bubbles. I tied it tight because I was interested to see what the tie resists do.

I soaked the yarn bundle in water and 1 tsp citric acid for 30 minutes.

The soaking wet hank was placed into my crockpot with no additional water.

To make the colors, I pulled out some teacups and put a few drops of the Neon Blue, Neon Purple, and Green into individual cups. I added a few drops of the Blue into each cup. The teacups were filled with water, but I didn’t do any mixing.

I poured half the cup of dye water over a bubble.

I repeated that process with the purple and green alternating the blue. 

Taking a leap of faith, I figured the crockpot wouldn’t burn the yarn because it can only get so hot. I covered it with a lid and set it to high heat for an hour. I knew the runoff of the dye would make mud on the bottle of the skein, but because green, blue and purple complement each other for the most part, I wasn’t too worried.

After an hour, I fished the yarn out of the crockpot with tongs and let it cool in the sink.

I cut off the ties (look at the resist!) and rinsed the yarn.

And off it went to dry.

This is where I did my happy dance. The dye broke! What does that mean? It means the individual colors of the dye separated and set at different times. For example, the purple broke into purple and pink, which is a delicious watercolor effect. I don’t know where the navy came from, but I love it!

Just another example where it shows its pays to not have a plan!

Stay tuned for next week and another I-have-no-idea-what-I’m-doing experiment!

Ready to make your unique colorway? Hop on over to Makers' Mercantile® and pick up your undyed yarn and supplies. We can’t wait to see what you make, so tag us on social media with #makersmercantile!

About Tara
Tara Warburton is the former graphic designer for Makers' Mercantile® and a fine artist. She specializes in watercolor and colored pencil illustrations. She lives with her two cats, who are not helpful when knitting.

Tara Warburton's Frost Fairy

2019 Holiday Wishlist

We know that buying gifts can sometimes be a daunting task... especially when the gift is for a crafty maker. You might have no idea what to get for them, and that leaves you with options like "bath robe" or "blender"...

Here's a list of some of our favorites of this season. 


Sock of the month club

This one is a gift that gives all year long. Starting in January, we send out a monthly subscription box that includes yarn and pattern to make a pair of socks. More than that, we host a KAL group for the projects in Ravelry.

Oh! We also will be including other goodies in the packages... each month it's something different! 

The subscription box can be canceled at any time with a simple email to hello@makersmercantile.com - click "Learn more" to learn all the details about this club. 



addi FlexiFlips 8 inch set

We crafted a full set of addi® FlexiFlips for the much-loved maker in your life. Made specifically for North America, these specially designed 21cm circulars (3.5" tips with 1" cord) rest comfortably in the hand, and act as flexible double pointed needles. Easy to use, stitches are simply distributed over two needles, and then knit with the third - resulting in only two needle changes per row. ​

This full set includes all 11 sizes, so you'll never be without the perfect needles, and when you order the full set at our great low price, you get the fabulous FlexiRoll … the only needle case designed specifically for the addi® FlexiFlips, free!


Makers' Apothecary Candles

Our 8oz. candles are hand-poured by a small business in Kentucky and feature pure, natural soy wax, clean-burning cotton wicks, and non-toxic scents.

More than just a candle, each Makers' Apothecary candle features a secret hidden deep inside. After the candle has burned enough to reveal the package, Carefully retrieve, and then open the foil to reveal a handmade stitch marker!

Each candle will burn approximately 40-50 hours. Consider making a gift package with candle, yarn, needles, and some treats for a well-rounded gift!


Knitting Comfortably: The Ergonomics of Handknitting

Imagine being told you have to stop knitting because of discomfort in your hands, arms, neck, or back. Imagine the sense of frustration and the longing to get the needles back in your hands. Imagine the lingering doubt you might have when you can pick them up again: “What was I doing wrong after all these years of knitting?” “Will I get hurt again?” “Will I have to stop knitting forever to make this pain go away?” Maybe you’d like to be a faster, more efficient knitter, or a knitter who produces more projects, but you’re not sure what’s getting in the way.

This book will help you understand the ergonomics of knitting so you can improve your safety, efficiency, and productivity in knitting. You’ll learn to identify ergonomic risks that contribute to injury and reduce knitting efficiency. Throughout the book, you’ll be provided with activities and guidance to improve your knitting ergonomics so you can knit more confidently and comfortably. Through instruction in stretches, exercise, and self-care, you’ll also learn how to manage the discomfort common to knitters before it becomes an injury, and how to recognize when it’s time to seek help from a health-care professional.

Join me in this unique knit-along that will help make a more comfortable, lifelong knitter out of you.


Sheep Herd Tote

Hand printed on 100% Cotton w/ cotton handles
13"x15"

Machine Wash Cold/Warm inside out, Hang to dry, Iron on Back

Each bag is printed by hand and may have slight variations which adds to the charm and beauty. The handmade nature of the bag assures that each one is individually unique.
Use at the grocery store, farmers market, library, or anywhere! Great as gifts for others and yourself!


Hanging Circular Needle Organizer

Double sided hanging circular needle organizer with 17 available slots. Each slot includes a clear window for your custom size. One side is denim, and the other side is natural. Measures approximately 8" wide x 32" long. Made exclusively for Makers' Mercantile by DellaQ. At the base of the organizer is a zippered pouch, plus one more bonus slot for oversized needles!


addi click turbo interchangeable needle set

addi Click Interchangeable Turbo Needle Set is one of the most popular interchangeable knitting needle sets on the market. They feature some of the best joins out there with a lifetime warranty! We love the addi Click Sets and know them inside and out. If you have questions on anything addi make sure to contact us, we are happy to help you figure out which set is right for you. The addi Click Interchangeable Turbo Needle Set system provides 10 different sizes of addi Turbo® tips (3.50 mm, 3.75 mm, 4.00 mm, 4.50 mm, 5.00 mm, 5.50 mm, 6.00 mm, 8.00 mm, 9.00 mm, and 10.00 mm), three different lengths of our new, extremely pliable blue cords (24”, 32” and 40”), and one connector piece which helps to either store stitches or combine your cords. The Click tips require no tools to change; simply insert the cord deep into the tip, twist and release. The tips will remain secure until you change them, thanks to the Clicks' revolutionary locking mechanism!


Kinky Yarn

100% Superwash Wool
200g / 133 meters / 147 yards
12-16 sts and 20-22 rows = 4" on US 10-13 (6-9.0 mm) needles

... but why is it in a coil? This fun yarn comes pre-knit in a 12 stitch tube (not an i-cord) and is ready to dye. Keep it coiled and place it in dye for an unusual effect, or open the coil and dip it all the way in a dyebath. Depending on your process, the yarn might have light spots where the fibers are compacted in the knitting. We think the undyed spots are super cool.  After the yarn is rinsed and dry, you'll pull the tail and work right from the coil. The kinky texture will add dimension to your work. Want a smoother finished project? Block the project and it'll relax just for you. 

It's easy to dye this yarn, AND it's easy to get professional results, no matter your level of experience. 




Schacht Cricket 10" Loom

The Schacht Cricket Loom is compact, capable, and cute! The Cricket is made of high-quality, unfinished apple plywood and hard maple, and each comes with an 8-dent reed (sorry, no substitutions). Included are a threading hook, warping peg, table clamps, two shuttles, and two balls of yarn. At only 11 in x 18 in x 6 in and just under four pounds, it is truly portable. The 10 inch weaving width gives plenty of room to make a variety of projects without sacrificing portability. This loom is an ideal size for a new weaver of any age. As of April 2010, the Cricket has been redesigned with the ratchet gear and dog on the outside of the loom to make it even easier to adjust tension. Additional reeds, pick up sticks, and other accessories for the Cricket are available.

The Cricket series looms are a great way to get started weaving. Don't let their small size fool you! These looms are fun and versatile to use, and all Schacht looms are made with pride in the USA with high quality craftsmanship and materials in Boulder, Colorado.  These portable looms are great for teaching weaving classes for adults and children. They are fairly simple to setup and are small and inexpensive enough that students can take the looms home between classes.

The Schacht Cricket was a craft finalist in the prestigious 2014 Martha Stewart American Made Awards. When you purchase a Schacht loom you know you're getting a well-designed tool built by craftsman who are dedicated to weaving.


artfelt kit - holey scarf

Even with holes, this scarf will keep you warm. The holes give this scarf an eclectic look while the multi-colored roving add in a pop of color that will go with a lot of different wardrobes.


addi Rocket 2 [Squared] circular knitting needle

Meet the addi® Rocket2 Squared, a line of square shaped circular needles with the same speedy addi® Turbo finish and featuring the beloved addi® Rocket tapered tips. 


Sizes are listed in approximate US sizes -AND- exact metric sizes for your convenience. All addi® needles are manufactured to exact metric sizes.


Fannie and the Crockpot

Eat, Knit and Dye

This week is two experiments in one for me. I’ve been wanting to try out using my crockpot for dyeing. However, since acid dyes aren’t food safe, I wasn’t ready to sacrifice my beloved crockpot. That left me with finding food safe dye options. In full disclosure, I wanted to try Kool-Aid, but my grocery store only had one flavor. (Disappointing to the kid in me, I remember there being a whole Kool-Aid section and begging my mom for one of each.) So food coloring it is!

I am going to be dying with Fannie this week. It’s a 100% Merino Wool Superwash with a gorgeous ply twist to it. The stitch definition is stunning.

For dyes, I picked up two boxes of food color in Neon and Basic colors. I figured with these two I can get a whole rainbow of colors.

While the yarn soaked in water, I filled up the crockpot. I decided I wanted to give middle immersion dyeing a chance, so I added a bunch of water. That means there was enough water for the dye to float around, but not enough to just become one color. And 1 tsp of citric acid.

The yarn was added to the crockpot and wiggled around to be randomized.

I used the food color bottles and dropped random drops of color on top of the yarn.

The process was repeated with the Neon Pink, Neon Blue and Neon Purple.

I’m not always a patient person, so I helped the color mixing along by squishing and lightly swishing the yarn and water around.

I popped the lid onto the crock pot and turned it on high for an hour. I checked it at the 45-minute mark by dipping a spoon into the water. Since the water was clear, I knew the food coloring had exhausted.

The yarn was cooled to room temperature and rinsed out. Off it went to hang dry and now I can admire the beautiful variety of color. The thing that surprised me the most was how much red showed up when though I didn’t use it.

I’d say the food coloring was a success! I can’t wait to give it a few more experiments just to see what it can do. Plus, I get to use the crock pot.

Stay tuned for next week where I have more fun with food coloring!

Ready to make your unique colorway? Hop on over to Makers' Mercantile® and pick up your undyed yarn and supplies. We can’t wait to see what you make, so tag us on social media with #makersmercantile!

About Tara
Tara Warburton is the former graphic designer for Makers' Mercantile® and a fine artist. She specializes in watercolor and colored pencil illustrations. She lives with her two cats, who are not helpful when knitting.

Tara Warburton's Frost Fairy

Hexalicious Cushion

Finished Size
22” diameter and stands 16” tall.

Gauge
Since this will be felted, you needn't really worry about gauge (Hooray!)​​

Yarn
Schoppel® Reggae Ombre; 100% Merino Wool,  109 yards per 50 gram ball

Color 1874, 2 balls
Color 1965, 1 ball
Color 1963, 1 ball

addi® Turbo Needles
Size US 10 (12 mm) needle

Notions
6 stitch markers, one to mark beginning of round
Tapestry needle
5 standard pillows or poly-fill for stuffing

Instructions
Make 12 hexagons in color #1874 and one in #1965 as follows: 

Cast on 13 stitches.

Row 1: Knit across row to last stitch, slip last stitch,holding yarn to front.
Row 2: Knit 1, *knit into front and back of the next stitch*, knit to last stitch and slip, holding yarn to front.
Row 3: Repeat row 2.
Repeat Rows 1-3 until you have 25 stitches. 

Continue with the following decrease rows:

Row 1: Knit across row to last stitch, slip last stitch,holding yarn to front.
Row 2: knit 1, knit 2 together, knit to last stitch, slip last stitch, holding yarn to front.
Row 3: Repeat row 2.
Repeat Rows 1-3 until 13 stitches remain.

Bind off all sts. Sew the 13 hexagons together in different directions to create a random pattern as shown in photo, remembering to put the unique hexagon in color 1965 in the center.

To remove the stepped edge and create a complete round, you will need to knit 6 oversized half hexagons in color #1963 as follows:

Cast on 13 stitches (or pick up 13 stitches in the voids between the outer hexagons).
Row 1: Knit across row to last stitch, slip last stitch,holding yarn to front.
Row 2: knit 1, *knit into front and back of the next stitch*, knit to last stitch and slip, holding yarn to front.
Row 3: Repeat row 2.
Repeat Rows 1-3 until you have 25 stitches.

Next Row: Knit 1, knit into front and back of next stitch, knit across row until 2 stitches remain, knit into front and back of next stitch, slip last stitch,holding yarn in the front.Repeat this row until you have 59 stitches. Bind off all sts. Sew the edges of the oversized half hexagons into place – creating a complete circle. If you’d prefer not to seam anything, you can work the hexagons modularly, picking up stitches from a just-worked hexagon. Wash to felt. Stuff and back as desired. Enjoy!

Upcycled Pillow Backs

Karin recommends seeking out large, colorful shirts without pockets. Look for fun buttons, or snaps. Most of these are found in the women’s department, in the extra large sizes. “Men’s shirts are excellent as well, but they frequently have pockets – which I generally avoid. However, pockets can be worked into a pillow back if you are making a gift, simply put a little message in the pocket for the recipient, and it will look like you did it on purpose!”

Avoid shirts with darts; you’re looking for square or rectangular pieces.In general, the width of the shirt, from seam to seam should be no smaller than the width of the pillow, and the length from the armpit to the hem should be no shorter than the length of the pillow. The larger the shirt, the larger your pillow can be. Cut the front body of your shirt away from the sleeves and the back. Lay it flat on a table, with the buttons closed and facing up. Lay your felted panel flat on the front of the shirt, right side facing down, touching the buttons. If there is room, align the shirt buttons so that they are centered on the panel.

Pin the panel to the shirt front, then use the panel as if it were a pattern piece and cut the shirt even to the panel. Keeping the panel and the shirt pinned together, use a sewing machine to stitch around the entire panel. Use a basic stitch,and keep the felt on the bottom while stitching. After you’ve stitched around the piece, open the button panel (it’s a little tricky, as the buttons are now on the inside) and turn inside out. Stuff it with a pre-made pillow form or poly-fill. You can easily create a custom-sized pillow form if you find an almost perfect zippered form: unzip it,remove some stuffing, sew a seam to make the case smaller,and you have a custom sized insert without a lot of work!

Ergonomics of Knitting – Carson Demers

"I’ve been a knitter much longer than I’ve been a physical therapist or an ergonomist, but I still remember my first addi experience.  I was knitting an afghan with let’s say “rustic” wool, and (horrors) bamboo needles.  Ah, the ergonomically unenlightened knitter that I was.   More time spent than one would hope for the amount of fabric produced, I confess my forearms were positively sore.  Then one evening while working on that project in a knitting circle at a local yarn shop I spied them.  Shiny, sleek, and downright sexy (yes, a knitting needle can be sexy!), someone across the table was working with an addi Turbo®.  I can’t lie - I was indeed first impressed by how beautiful those needles looked.  But, it didn’t take much observation to see how effortless they made that knitter’s work.  Stitches were soaring.  So then and there I bought a circular to replace the bamboo needle I was using.  Smooth, fluid, and best of all comfortable, my knitting experience was transformed.  

That was my first addi Turbo® and I’ve been a fan ever since.  I’m a lot more ergonomically savvy now than I was at that time and I still love my Turbos.  They pair perfectly with yarns that offer resistance on other needles, reducing the work of forearm and hand muscles. Their cables are strong, smooth, well behaved and support even a heavy afghan without fuss.  I love how the reflective surface of the needle creates value contrast with nearly any yarn - which makes using them easy on the eyes in more ways than one.  Comfort is always an ergonomic priority and addi Turbos® help me knit comfortably."

It's no secret that we are fans of Carson Demers and his work to help fiber artists continue making with less opportunity for injuries. his book, Knitting Comfortably: The Ergonomics of Handknitting contains all the information you could need to help ensure a long life of comfortable crafting. We are also delighted to offer this book for purchase in our shop and online. 

Imagine being told you have to stop knitting because of discomfort in your hands, arms, neck, or back. Imagine the sense of frustration and the longing to get the needles back in your hands. Imagine the lingering doubt you might have when you can pick them up again: “What was I doing wrong after all these years of knitting?” “Will I get hurt again?” “Will I have to stop knitting forever to make this pain go away?” Maybe you’d like to be a faster, more efficient knitter, or a knitter who produces more projects, but you’re not sure what’s getting in the way.

This book will help you understand the ergonomics of knitting so you can improve your safety, efficiency, and productivity in knitting. You’ll learn to identify ergonomic risks that contribute to injury and reduce knitting efficiency. Throughout the book, you’ll be provided with activities and guidance to improve your knitting ergonomics so you can knit more confidently and comfortably. Through instruction in stretches, exercise, and self-care, you’ll also learn how to manage the discomfort common to knitters before it becomes an injury, and how to recognize when it’s time to seek help from a health-care professional.

Want to knit comfortably? Get your very own copy of Carson's book here:

About Carson Demers:
By day, Carson is a physical therapist who runs an ergonomics program for a San Francisco Bay Area medical center. Every other moment, he’s knitting, spinning, designing, teaching, writing, or otherwise up to some fiber fun with a watchful eye toward ergonomics. His passion and experience in fiber arts combine with his expertise in physical therapy and ergonomics to create a unique skill set that he eagerly shares with the fiber community at local yarn shops, guilds, and major knitting events across the country. He is a regular contributor to Ply magazine.

Sadie Fiery Sunset Part 4

Eat, Knit and Dye

It’s the final week of the 4 Skein Fiery Sunset fade set and I’m so excited to see how this turns out. Don’t know what I’m talking about? Check out Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. So far, it’s shaping up to stunningly bright set, and that’s right up my alley.

Once again, I am using Sadie as my base. The nice thing about using the same yarn for each color is I know that the gauge and fabric will match. I know that you can mix yarn in a single project, but I’m just more comfortable using the same yarn base together.

In looking at the 3 colorways I have already dyed, I think that it makes the most visual sense to do something in the yellow end of my color spectrum to balance out the colors.

For this, I used Jacquard Acid Dyes.
• Yellow = 1/4 tsp Jacquard Sun Yellow
• Orange = 1/8 tsp Jacquard Sun Yellow and 1/16 tsp Deep Orange

Wanting a mostly solid yellow base layer for the yarn, I filled up my old pot with water, the dye and 1 tsp of citric acid. As you can see, this pot is starting to get pretty worn down. Acid dyes are not food safe and should only be used in dye-dedicated pots and this is a good reason why. All of the repeated uses of citric acid and dye is causing the Teflon to wear away and peel. This isn’t the only pan I use where this is happening. I don’t care about the damage, but I certainly wouldn’t use these pans to make food.

After soaking the yarn for 30 minutes in water, I placed it into the dye pot and made sure it had plenty of room for the dye to circulate. I brought the water up to a near simmering temperature and let the dye exhaust.

To add a bit of depth and texture to the yarn, I splattered orange dye mixed into a condiment bottle on the very top of the yarn and again, let it exhaust.

Using the shower ring, I pulled the yarn out of the now clear water and decided it needed a little bit more orange, so I put back in with the pot. I did try to get the mostly all yellow section on top.

And I added just a smidge more of the orange dye, letting it exhaust.

It turned out perfectly! It’s a beautiful yellow with hints of orange mottling. I think it’s going to knit up in a beautiful fabric of a tonal yellow with just a little bit of interest. And it balances out the Fade set just right.

Now all that’s left it to knit this up into something! I can’t wait to get started.

Stay tuned for next week where we see what a crockpot can do!

Ready to make your unique colorway? Hop on over to Makers' Mercantile® and pick up your undyed yarn and supplies. We can’t wait to see what you make, so tag us on social media with #makersmercantile!

About Tara
Tara Warburton is the former graphic designer for Makers' Mercantile® and a fine artist. She specializes in watercolor and colored pencil illustrations. She lives with her two cats, who are not helpful when knitting.

Tara Warburton's Frost Fairy

Sadie Fiery Sunset Part 3

Eat, Knit and Dye

As I continue my way through dyeing a 4-Skein coordinating fade (see Part 1 and Part 2 here!), I’m tackling the next colorway. Since the original colorway features all 6 colors, I decided it would be the middle of the fade. Last week I used red, orange and yellow. This week, I’m going to red, pink, purple and blue. 

Once again, I am using Sadie as my base. It’s a sock yarn, and before its dyed, it feels a bit coarse. But once it absorbs the dye and spends some time in hot water, it becomes this fluffy and soft yarn, and very squishy. It’s one of my favorites of our undyed bases.

And because I used the fancy fish pan for the last week's project, it seems only fair the brownie pan makes an appearance. I’m particularly excited about using it because this extra-long hank is finally long enough to fill out all the sections of the brownie pan. The pan was filled with some water and 1 tsp of citric acid.

While the yarn was off soaking in water, I mixed up my dyes in condiment bottles. Once again, I am using the colors from the original colorway and they are all Jacquard Acid Dyes.
• Red = 1/8 tsp Jacquard Fire Red
• Magenta = 1/8 tsp Jacquard Hot Fuchsia
• Purple = 1/16 tsp Jacquard Violet and 1/16 tsp Brilliant Blue
• Blue = 1/8 tsp Jacquard Brilliant Blue

I’m calling this my haphazard application process. I used the bottles to lay down random blocks of colors, many of them jumping over the brownie edge dividers.

I did try to keep the red and pink together, and also the blue and purple. And then I let the dye exhaust.

Using my prongs, I poked around the yarn and determined the bottom hadn’t dyed. This is what I expected to find.

I picked up the hank and turned it over. And replied the dye in roughly the same places. And then, you guessed it! I let the dye exhaust.

With the prongs, I flipped up the yarn to see how much was left undyed. There was more than I wanted.

I added some dye to the water and draped the wet yarn across the dye water. I know it’s not going to penetrate all the way through, but I’m embracing the mottled look.

I’m super happy with how it turned out. The colors match perfectly, and my fade is starting to shape up! Is this the Twilight section?

Stay tuned for next week for the final skein of Fiery Sunset Fade!

Ready to make your unique colorway? Hop on over to Makers' Mercantile® and pick up your undyed yarn and supplies. We can’t wait to see what you make, so tag us on social media with #makersmercantile!

Jacinto Ottoman

Kick your feet up on this comfy, squishy ottoman! Worked in 100% Merino with large needles it's a faster-than-you-imagine project and adds additional seating in your home that celebrates your knitterly talents.

Finished Size
22” diameter and stands 16” tall.

Gauge
10 stitches and 24 rounds = 4 inches in Linen Stitch.

Yarn
​​Schoppel XL
100% Merino Wool; 72 yards per 100 gram hank

7 skeins #7251 Camel (Main Color)
1 skein #6045 Fern (CC 1)
1 skein #0581 Savanna (CC 2)
1 skein #1100 Shrimp (CC 3)
1 skein #2790 Pink (CC 4)

addi® Needles
Size US 17 (12 mm) 40” circular needle
Size US 17 (12 mm) double pointed needles

Notions
6 stitch markers, one to mark beginning of round
Tapestry needle
5 standard pillows or poly-fill for stuffing

Instructions
Using size 17 (12 mm) 40” circular needle and MC, cast on 169 stitches. Join to work in the round, being careful not to twist. Place marker to mark beginning of round and knit two rounds. Work in Linen Stitch pattern as follows:

Linen Stitch
Round 1: with CC1, *knit 1, slip 1 with yarn in front, repeat from * to end of round, end knit 1.
Round 2: with CC1, *slip 1 with yarn in front, knit 1, repeat from * to end of round, end slip 1 with yarn in front.
Round 3: with MC, repeat round 1.
Round 4: with MC, repeat round 2.

Repeat these 4 rounds until stripe measures 3”, ending with round 4. Work 3” as established with CC2, then CC3. Work 5” in CC4, then 2” in CC3. Knit 2 rows with MC, decreasing 1 stitch in last round. Bind off all stitches. With MC and circular needle, pick up and knit 168 stitches. *Knit 28, place marker, repeat from * 5 times. You will have 6 sections.

On following round, decrease as follows: *knit 2 together, knit to 2 stitches before marker, slip, slip, knit these two slipped stitches together through the back loop, repeat from * to end of round. 156 stitches. Knit one round. Repeat these two rounds until 12 stitches remain, switching to double pointed needles when there are too few stitches to fit around circular needle.If desired, use remaining contrast shades to create a bull’s-eye pattern, knitting with CC on plain knit rounds and working decrease rounds in MC.

Cut yarn leaving an 18” tail and draw through remaining stitches several times, drawing the piece closed in the process. Weave in ends. Repeat on cast-on edge with MC only, stuffing the ottoman as you work. Weave in all ends and steam gently if desired.