Stop Number Three

Hello again weavers,

Just a little note to let you know we are still adventuring along on the More than a Mile-long Hippie Galaxie path. In other words, a very colorful journey. You can read the first post HERE, and the second post HERE. I hope you enjoy this new project, it was a lot of fun to make!            

When I was originally thinking about the idea of using color blocking for this wrap the idea was huge! I envisioned a large wall hanging of Mondrian type color sections divided by black lines of various sizes. So, I needed to pare it down to a doable size for a Rigid Heddle loom idea. Changes were made and I sliced the middle out of the original idea and came up with Not Quite Mondrian. When you look at it perhaps you can see the rest of the original plan.

To simplify the pattern, I left out the vertical solid black lines that were part of my original vision.

The next photo shows my final design decision. Get out those colored pencils! Yes, it is in my notebook - you know how much I love keeping records! You can download the free Weaving Project Page HERE.

The color blocking is made possible by a tapestry technique called single weft interlock. There are a number of different ways to execute this technique, I have also seen it referred to as interlocking weft and discontinuous weft. This also means that you can have more than 2 colors to a pick to create blocks of color. That’s where the simplification came in for this idea, I reduced the number of sections and so reduced the number of colors that needed to interlock with each other in a single row. If I had left the vertical black lines in the design, there would have been three or four colors to each pick. That being said, I encourage you to  experiment with variations of this technique.

Weft interlock is really a family of techniques.  Each technique using 2 or more colors that come together either in one shed or a combination of sheds. Each throw is not a full pick of the weft thread, they are interrupted either by another thread or by stopping within the warp itself and venturing off into a new direction.

For this design we are interrupting the pick in the approximate center of the warp using one color from the right and a second color from the left. Both colors will come up out of the warp in the same spot: 


The warp is then beat into place. Change sheds, interlock the two colors... 


...and then go back through the new shed to each respective side of the warp. Beat the pick into place and you have completed 2 picks of 2 colors each.

This technique also creates a definite right and wrong side to the fabric. I like both sides, one has more texture the other is smoother after the wet finishing process. The top side (the top of the cloth on your loom) is referred to as the wrong side.

The next two photos are taken after the wet finish process. The first is the top or wrong side of the work, the second is the reverse side. You can see the textural difference. Since this project became a closed loop scarf, you will see both sides. But my chosen side is the one with more texture and that is the side with the fringe.

Scarf Specifications

This scarf was woven using a 12-dent heddle on a rigid heddle loom with a width of 15”. The warp is 8/2 cotton used as a single thread. The warp length is approximately 100”.

To keep track of my sections I used a measuring string. This time I measured and divided the length into 10” sections and marked them with a black permanent ink pen. Your measuring string is now a pattern string. I keep mine in a marked plastic bag, so I do not have to remake it for every project. Make sure that you write down the length of your string and the number of sections so you don’t forget once it begins to be wound into your warp!

The picture below shows the string pattern circled in green.

When winding the color shuttles, you will need two at a time. After securing the first color to the shuttle, begin winding onto the shuttle counting every time you make one full rotation around the shuttle. For this color plan I counted to 20 and cut my yarn. This shuttle is loaded and ready to weave. Move onto the second color and wind the same way. This plan allowed me to have less waste on the shuttle and fewer smaller pieces of yarn, since you are using the shuttle until it is empty. You will also need to wind a shuttle with the 8/2 cotton doubled to use in between the color blocks. Depending on the way that you weave, you may want to add more yarn to your shuttles. Also, you may want to change the size of the black stripes that divide the color blocks and that will affect the amount of color. The 10” sections are just a guide to spread the colors more evenly throughout the scarf.

Begin weaving with a waste yarn to spread the warp and use waste yarn at the end of the warp.

Remember, this is only an idea! A place to start……the loom is your canvas, your thread is your palette, you are the artist.

Weave on……..

Finishing

When you are removing your warp from the loom make sure to keep your waste yarn in place. This will make it easier to complete your fringe. This scarf is finished as a continuous loop held in place by the knots at the edges of the warp.

This is just an option, personally I like a scarf that does not have ends to slip off my shoulders. So, it became an oversized, double wrap cowl. You could finish this as a straight scarf with fringe on both ends and add beads, or not, and it would be amazing!

IS THIS THE END OF THE MILE??? A resounding NO!!!

When we started this journey there were plans for 3 scarves, but since the box still has yarn in it, there is no stopping us now!

Stay tuned for a little lagniappe for your loom…….

References for this post:

www.ashford.co.nz/ashford-club (Stained Glass on the Rigid Heddle Loom)

The Weaver’s Journal Summer 1987 (Tapestry Tips)

Weave*Knit*Wear by Judith Shangold


It’s All Right Moebius MKAL with Ellen Thomas of The Chilly Dog

Let's start the new year with a new, engaging (and fun!) project. Ellen Thomas of The Chilly Dog has partnered with us to bring you the It's All Right Möbius MKAL (mystery knit-along). 

This fun one-sided shape begins with an adventurous cast on, and because there is only one side, Ellen was clever with the name of the project. 

As we knit together, we will discover that after the cast on, and first round, the knitting is a simple progression of 10-stitch repeats and l - o - n - g rounds. Of course, we will host a forum on Ravelry, and Ellen has created a series of videos to assist from cast on to bind off!

The finished piece? Well, we can't show you exactly what it looks like, or it wouldn't be a mystery... but we promise it's a gorgeous study in geometry that you'll be proud to wear or gift.  

gather your supplies

  • 2 hanks Silbermond by Zitron (main color)
  • 1 ball Herbstwind by Zitron (accent color)
  • US size 6 (4.0 mm), or size necessary to obtain gauge, 60-inch long addi® Rocket 2 [Squared] circular needle
  • stitch marker
January 8, 2021 - Week 1 clue revealed

January 15, 2021 - Week 2 clue revealed

January 22, 2021 - Week 3 clue revealed

January 29, 2021 - Week 4 clue revealed

Each week on Friday, by 9am Pacific, we will update the pattern file on Ravelry, and we will send a notification to you that you can download the next set of instructions. Work at your own pace (remember, knitting is supposed to be fun!) and engage with your fellow makers in the Ravelry group HERE.


Moebius Project Bag

Need a fun way to remember how to do the Moebius cast on? Look no further than our exclusive instruction bag. Printed, cut, and sewn in our Kent, WA shop, this drawstring bag features detailed instructions on how to do this ingenius cast on. If you are more of a visual learner, simply scan the QR code and Ellen Thomas of The Chilly Dog will show you how it's done in her fantastic video.

Measures approximately 13.5 x 14.5 inches


Yarn & Needles

Zitron Silbermond

Silbermond by Zitron
100% Tasmanian Extrafine Merino
330 m/100 g hank

(2 hanks - main color)


Herbstwind by Zitron
100% Tasmanian Extrafine Merino
165 m/50 g ball

(1 ball - accent color)


addi© Turbo fixed circular needle
100% Tasmanian Extrafine Merino
165 m/50 g ball

(1 ball - accent color)


Join the Makers’ Mercantile Ravelry Group HERE

Share your project photos with fellow makers!

#ItsAllRightMKAL    #MakersMercantile    #TheChillyDog

What can you do with a mile of yarn?

The answer is, so many amazing things, but today we are going to focus on how much weaving you can complete with a Bobbel Box of yarn.

The Lola yarn is a weaver’s happy place, buying yarn to use on your loom or looms (as in my case) is a little different in quantity. Buying yarn for your looms can be done by the pound! Yes, that sounds a little crazy, but to make sure you have the materials you need to complete large and/or multiple projects, buying larger quantities at a time can speed you on the way of completed projects. The Lola Box is a little over a pound of yarn (approximately 18 oz), and 2,050 yards for over a mile of yarn!

You can use your yarn stash and purchase new skeins, cakes, and balls of yarn of all types to use on your loom in conjunction with yarn you will purchase in larger quantities. Many of my projects are made up of yarn purchased by the skein and a yarn purchased by the pound or half-pound.

The foundation yarn and primary colorway for these projects is the Lola Bobble Box, specifically the Hippie Galaxy colorway. The first project was inspired by a project in Handwoven magazine. As a matter of fact, it is on the cover of the May/June 2018 issue. It is called the Travel Shawl by Deborah Jarchow and it is an amazing combination of cotton/acrylic in the warp and mohair for the weft. Handwoven is an amazing magazine and I highly recommend getting a subscription, there are projects for all types of looms and no matter what your abilities it can inspire and help you along the Weaving Way. I wanted to use the 20” Schacht Flip Loom for this project, so I narrowed the project from 3 individual 10” wide warps to one 20” wide warp and adjusted the amount of each color used for the striped warp.

Tools
20” loom
10 dent heddle
Fringe twister
100” warp with 200 ends
String measuring tool

Materials
One Lola Bobbel Box
One ball Extra Klasse by Zitron

Warping
Beginning at the center of the heddle will give you better control with your color placement.

Mark a center slot on your heddle, this comes in handy for every project!

Tie on and tie off each color section to the back apron bar, once you have started the center color you will be moving back and forth on either side of the center to add the next colors. Painting your heddle with color!

The center color (color 1) will straddle the center of the heddle. If you are direct warping, divide the number of ends by 2 and warp the slots only. Once you have the center 10 slots warped you can tie off and then tie on Color 2 and warp 5 slots on either side of the center section, and so on until you are all the way across the 20” heddle or to your desired width. See the following chart:

Notes for Happy Warping (I love being warped)

When you have finished warping your loom and have tied the warp at the peg end, DO NOT CUT the warp loops at the peg. Just slip the warp off the peg and proceed to winding the warp on the loom using your preferred separation materials. Once you have your warp wound on and you begin to thread your holes cut only one loop at a time before threading. This may take a few more minutes but the rewards will be well worth doing it this way! So, you are wondering why, as you have noticed the yarn is made up of four individual threads not plied together. While this is one of the things that makes this yarn so great for weaving, it can also cause a bit of a problem with your warping. If you cut all the warp ends at one time you run the risk of not pulling the correct threads together when you thread the holes resulting in a not well-behaved warp (yes, I have had this experience).

When you have finished threading the heddle, its time to tie onto the front with your preferred method. You will be using the tie on ends for your fringe, so if you are tying the ends directly to the front apron bar make sure you have about 5” in the tie on. Spread your warp with waste yarn, this is my preferred method as it makes it easier to control the threads when I am knotting for fringe especially if I am not doing a hemstitch.

However, for this project I did hemstitch and then created the twisted fringe. I liked how the mohair looked in the basic hemstitch design.

But first, we need to weave our wrap! This is a lightly beaten weft, so when you beat your weft pick you are doing it gently. It is more of a placing of the weft at the fell line.

When you begin your weaving I highly recommend that you create a string measuring tool for your work. You can also clip a measuring tape to the warp, but I find that this works better for me. I use a contrast, cut to the length I need, piece of crochet cotton. To measure for this project: leave a 4” tail and tie a knot, then measure 90” from the knot and cut. The knot and tail will be threaded in the first row of weaving, using a tapestry needle thread the tail into the waste yarn for a few inches to secure.

This little string will answer the question “How far have I woven and how far do I have to go?” Make sure that you have recorded the length of the string on your Project Page along with all the other information you will need in the future. Such as, your materials, your heddle dent and width of project.

When you have woven far enough that you have the apron bar wound forward so you can see how much warp you have left, leave enough for fringe and put in a few picks of waste yarn to secure the warp. If you hemstitched at the beginning you can do that now before you remove the warp, if you decide after removing your warp from the loom that you want to hemstitch you certainly can!

Remember to measure your woven fabric after removing from the loom, and record on your project page. I like to twist the fringe before the wet finishing. Once you have finished the fringe, and woven in any ends, you are ready to wet finish. For this wrap I did a tub soak using Eucalan, while it is in the water I give it a few squishes to help encourage the fibers to work together and then let it soak for about 30 minutes. Then I squeeze it and then roll it up flat in a towel or two and hang to dry, I usually put it over the shower curtain rod. Yes, you can dry it flat, but here in the Pacific Northwest it dries better hanging. I do move it around a few times to keep it from getting kinked. And, I get to interact with the fabric and smile.

The information in this post is a guideline for your wrap. Weaving is a personal and individual process. You can make it wider narrower, longer or shorter! Remember you will have to adjust the amount of yarn you have for the weft. If your warp is wider or longer you will need to purchase an additional ball of weft yarn.

This picture highlights the airy and light nature of the fabric created by using the Lola and mohair together.

I hope you enjoy working with this amazing yarn, and remember this is only the first stop on our Lola Bobbel Box journey.

Weave on,                          

Cynthia          


Products mentioned in this post: 

Happy Hour KAL with Marie Greene of Olive Knits

Here in the Pacific Northwest our favorite pre-Pandemic outings were for Happy Hour. Typically offered between 3 – 5 PM, meeting a friend for Happy Hour was often the most looked-forward-to date on the calendar. It meant meeting at a favorite local haunt to share a tasty bite to eat and maybe a glass of wine (at a discount!). For me, Happy Hour is about stepping away from the stresses of the day to savor the last bits of daylight with a friend. 
Click on the video (above) to watch Marie tell you all about it!

We may be finding new ways to connect these days, but we can still mark those hours from 3-5 once in a while to connect with our favorite people. What time shall we meet for Happy Hour? Choose 3 PM, 4 PM, or 5 PM by selecting the same number of pattern repeats on your yoke.


jOIN THE CONVERSATION

Share your project progress with fellow Makers' in the Olive Knits Student Lounge HERE, and on social media using the following hashtags:

#HappyHourKAL
#OliveKnits
#MakersMercantile


Happy Hour KAL Party!



Sign up for these FREE events, and you will receive invitation emails with information on how to join the virtual meetings on the day of the event. Learn about accessing our online events HERE.


Monday, 10/19, 5-6pm (Pacific) | Happy Hour Cast on Party

Monday, 11/2, 5-6pm (Pacific) | Happy Hour Check in 

Monday, 11/30, 5-6pm (Pacific | Happy Hour Show and Tell


Materials

DK | Hikoo Sueño | 80% superwash merino, 20% viscose from Bamboo | 255 yards/233 m in 100g

Main Color: 950 (1100, 1250, 1388, 1483, 1560, 1642, 1728, 1820) yards/ 868 (1005, 1143, 1269, 1356, 1426, 1501, 1580, 1664) meters
Contrast Color: 175 (187, 200, 212, 229, 243, 257, 273, 289) yards/ 160 (171, 183, 194, 209, 222, 235, 249, 264) meters

Sizes: 1 (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
Finished bust/chest measurements: 32 (37, 41, 46, 50, 52, 57, 63, 66) in / 81.28 (93.98, 104.14, 116.84, 127, 132.08, 144.78, 160.02, 167.64) cm
Yoke Depth: 8.9 (9.2, 9.9, 10, 11.3, 11.3, 11.5, 12.5, 12.8) in / 22.61 (23.37, 25.15, 25.4, 28.7, 28.7, 29.21, 31.75, 32.51) cm

Note about choosing size: Choose the size that gives you a finished measurement that is 2-4 in/5-10 cm larger than your actual chest/bust measurement.

Needles
Note: Adjust your needle size, if necessary, to obtain correct gauge. You may need to go up or down a needle size to reach the recommended gauge – that’s perfectly normal.


US Size 3/3.25mm (16 in/40 cm) circular needle – neckline (for a looser neckline, go up a needle size)

US size 4/3.5mm (24 in/60 cm) circular needle – upper body

US Size 4/3.5mm (32-40 in/80-100 cm) circular needle – as needed for body stitches

US size 3/3.25mm (24-40 in/60-100 cm) circular needle – lower body ribbing

US Size 4/3.5mm (12 in) circular or DPNs or Magic Loop – sleeves

US Size 3/3.25mm (12 in) circular or DPNs or Magic Loop – cuffs

August, 2020 MKAL with The Chilly Dog

The Chilly Dog Logo

Solacer Wrap MKAL

Ready for a relaxing, rewarding project? Ellen Thomas of The Chilly Dog is hosting our next knit-along, and we couldn't be more excited to share the details (well, some of them) with you!

That's right, this time it's a mystery! Working with Popcycle by HiKoo, the Solacer Wrap is designed to be meditative, and Ellen's calm, clear presentation of both pattern and technique promises to deliver a stress-free experience. 

Knit along with the group as we progress week to week and the project is slowly revealed. We assure you that it's a lovely finished object, and that once complete, it is ideal for those cooler nights and mornings that are just around the bend.

Timeline

Each week, the Solacer Wrap MKAL pattern file will be updated to include the following sections: 


Friday, July 31 – Sections 1 and 2 are released
Monday, August 3 – Section 3
Monday, August 10 – Section 4
Monday, August 17 – Section 5
Monday, August 24 – The complete pattern file is released, and photography is updated on the pattern file.

The pattern will be updated with the first clues revealed on
July 31, 2020 at 9am Pacific!

Solacer Wrap MKAL

Join the Conversation

Share your project progress with fellow Makers' in our Ravelry group HERE, and on social media using the following hashtags:

#SolacerWrapMKAL
#MakersMercantile
#TheChillyDog

The Kit

Each kit contains everything you need (except time!) to make this gorgeous wrap, including: 

  • 3 hanks of Popcycle by HiKoo
  • 20" or 24" long addi Natura Bamboo fixed circular size US 4 (3.50 mm)*
  • Five (5) locking stitch markers
  • Download code for the Solacer Wrap MKAL pattern
  • Makers' Mercantile drawstring project bag
*Depending on availability

Materials

Materials

Popcycle by HiKoo®

(3) hanks

Finished

Size

12 1/2" wide

x 66" long,

after blocking

Needles

US 4 (3.50 mm)

20" circulars

Gauge

25 Stitches x 31 rows

= 4" in Stockinette 

Notions

  • 5 Stitch Markers

  • Measuring Tape

  • Scissors

  • Tapestry Needle

April 2020 – Curious Make Along with Franklin Habit

Today the the first day of our next Curious Make Along with Franklin Habit.

From the unique shape to the gorgeous play of color, the Temple of Flora has intrigued me and had me longing to cast on, but my favorite part of this pattern is the use of the mosaic technique. 

I am a huge fan of colorwork patterns and mosaic knitting is one of my favorite ways to add colorful designs. Using one color at a time makes mosaic knitting one of the easiest colorwork techniques, and it eliminates the worry of puckering due to strands pulled too tight.  Additionally, because these patterns are created with slipped stitches, it makes the patterns more geometric in nature and the charts are easier to read and follow.

 

I have already cast on and I have been using this project to

Zauberball Crazy Cotton in color 2392 & HiKoo Cobasi DK in 2020 Color of the Year

practice my backwards knitting skills.  What is knitting backwards you ask? It is exactly what it sounds like and rather than turning your work to purl the next row, you knit “back” over the stitches. It is a particularly useful skill when knitting a small number of stitches with two colors of yarn, as it keeps the yarn from tangling when you turn at the end of every row. Want to learn more? Our friend Chilly Dog is hosting a video event on April 11th to teach you this useful technique. You can learn more here.

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to knit along with us we have a few kits left, so order a kit and knit along, we can’t wait to see how your colors play together, and don’t forget to tag your project #curiouskal and #templeofflora

 

 

Until next time – Happy Knitting!

April 2020 Knit Along with Franklin Habit

 

The Temple of Flora Wrap, knit with Schoppel-Wolle Zauberball Crazy Cotton, was inspired by time spent wandering along among the ancient Roman ruins of Ostia and Herculaneum. Brilliant colors shimmer, shatter, and disappear across a field of geometric mosaic knitting. The pattern includes several other skill-building techniques such as chart reading, short rowing, and a simple (but optional) crochet edge detail. The piece is designed to sit comfortably on the shoulders through a shaped neck edge and an unusual bat-wing construction. If you’re a knitter who enjoys a bit of a challenge in pursuit of a beautiful finished object, join Franklin Habit in making your own Temple of Flora. As always, Curious Knit-Along with Makers’ Mercantile offers online support including videos; extended illustrated discussions of technique, history, and design; plus the fellowship of a supportive and enthusiastic community.

Project

flora-06-r

Get the Kit

As always, our Curious Knit-Alongs are designed for the knitter who is looking to learn a little bit more about the history of knitting, the structure of knitted fabrics, and techniques they may not yet have encountered. All this, plus the fellowship of a friendly and supportive group moderated by the designer.

The KAL begins April 10th, and the adventure will continue through May 8, 2020.

flora-08-r
Shown in Version A Colorway

Join the Knit-Along and spend time with other makers in the forum. Franklin will add witty instruction and guidance as the KAL progresses. If the kits have sold out, or if you’d like to use different colors or yarn, use the links below to purchase kit components (while supplies last).

Materials

                                                                                   

                  

 

Materials

Zauberball Crazy Cotton100% Organic Cotton 230 yds / 100g ball

Version A (Sample) Sold Out C1: 2368, 2 balls; C2: 2367, 3 balls

Version B C1: 2367, 2 balls; C2: 2368, 3 balls

Version C C1: 2392, 2 balls; C2: 2366, 3 balls

Version D C1: 2390, 2 balls; C2: 2366, 3 balls

Version E C1: 2391, 2 balls; C2: 2392, 3 balls

Finished Size

74″ Wingspan x 34″ High

Needles

addi® US 4 (3.50mm) 24” (60cm) long circular needle, or size needed to obtain gauge.

Gauge

20 sts and 40 rows = 4” in garter stitch

Notions

24 Locking-Ring Stitch Markers

About 8 yards of plain, light-colored worsted-weight scrap yarn

Measuring Tape

Scissors

Tapestry Needle

Yarn

PLEASE NOTE: 

Every ball is unique.Not all colors shown will be found in all balls.

Zauberball Crazy Cotton

Fiber Content

100% Organic Cotton

Yardage / Weight

230 yards / 210 meters per 100 gram ball

Gauge

US 2 – 6 (3.00 – 4.00 mm) needles6 stitches per inch

Care Instructions

Hand wash, dry flat

 

Make Along Update

THE WEEKENDER

JANUARY 3 - FEBRUARY 28, 2020

We are giving ourselves until the end of the month to finish The Weekender sweater by Andrea Mowry. While we have a suggested time frame for the knit along it's never to late to join in and finish at your own pace.  We recommend using HiKoo® Trenzado or any other worsted weight wool.

Believe it or not, we already have two completed sweaters!

And we've got a third sweater working on the last few rows of the first sleeve!

Knit using

HiKoo® Kenzie 1026 Kea

We are so excited to finish up our sweaters and wear them in March!
If you've been knitting along from afar, share it with us on social media by tagging us @makersmercantile.

THE WITCHING HOUR KAL
FEBRUARY 7TH - MARCH 27TH

Knit Using HiKoo® Sueno

Knit using HiKoo® Simplicity Spray and HiKoo® Sueno 

Join in the Fun!

It's still early in the knit along and because we are so excited to have you knit along with us we are offering the pattern FREE with the purchase of the yarn!

February Sock of the Month

Howdy Ya'll!

Is it just me or was January 872 days long? But now you probably got your February sock box, and since we are inching towards Valentines Day we're celebrating all things love and sweets... so perhaps February will scoot a long a little better. (January seriously. It was not pretty!)

First of all, isn't the yarn just yummy? I loved watching it change as I knit these socks and I love how squooshy it is. I am a loose knitter and almost every sock I knit is done on US1s. I knit these on size US2 FlipSticks. That sharper tip was so perfect for the yarnover stitch in the pattern.

And speaking of that little stitch, loosen up on that...I ripped back more than once because I just kept pulling it too tight and it looked funny and made little holes. Once I loosened up, the arrows started to pop and they were so much fun. Creating them made the pattern go faster, and it was such fun watching them take shape. (I realize now that in progress pictures would have been so helpful for you guys and I just didn't think of it but I will do better next month, I promise!)

The other thing I wanted to mention was the size of the sock. I worried that it wasn't as adjustable like a lot of patterns I use or create.... And with that stitch count.. how's this going to fit my fat foot?! It fit me great (also I love the ribbing on the ankle) but then! In some sort of sock magic! It also fit my teen daughter with a slimmer and smaller foot. So go for it. There's a lot of give in the fit!

If you didn't get this month's box, or you're curious what's inside, you can watch Karin reveal the February Sock of the Month box in this video:

I hope you like your stitch marker. CeeCee and I really wanted to capture how deep and beautiful the red of the yarn was. We love making stitch markers and playing in beads. In a future month we might create a stitch marker tutorial for you...they make great gifts and are so fun for sharing and swapping.

I'm in the Ravelry group (I'm Knittybe over there) so please hop over there and join the conversation. If you get stuck, or something doesn't make sense, please ask! I know you will enjoy knitting these cozy socks and I'm glad to help you if you need it. I love knitting socks and if you're new to it, it really doesn't need to be scary.

I may have already had a peek at the yarn for next month...in fact, it *might* be on my needles right now. It's beautiful yarn. The pattern is fun. It is different from anything I've done before and I don't want you to miss it! Please sign up for March before they sell out!

Your sock knitting pal,

BeLinda

March 2020 Knit Along with Kyle Kunnecke

The key to what, you ask? Success? Change? Happiness? Love? 

Choose your goal and move forward stitch by stitch as you create the repeating large-scale skeleton key motif in the Unlocked cowl. 


In this KAL sponsored by skacel, Kyle Kunnecke guides you with helpful video instruction that clearly demonstrates two-handed knitting, working with two colors at once, and his favorite technique, locking floats. 

HiKoo® Concentric is used in this project because not only does it shift in color, but it is also made of luxurious 100% Baby Alpaca. The resulting fabric is soft, lightweight, and cozy.

Project

We will venture into the world of large expanses of negative space within the motif of this cowl. This provides an excellent opportunity to learn (and master!) locked floats in the round.


The Unlocked cowl is worked from the bottom up and requires knitting knowledge including: cast-on/bind-off, knit/purl, reading charts, securing/locking floats; all on circular needles. 

Join the Knit-Along and spend time with other makers in the forum. Kyle also designed a very limited edition project bag for this KAL. Want one? The first customers to purchase two cakes of HiKoo® Concentric will receive the bag and a custom stitch marker in addition to  a download code for the pattern as a thank you for signing up early.

Now through March 31, 2020, any customer who purchases two cakes of HiKoo® Concentric will receive the pattern as a free gift.

In the forum, Kyle will check in and offer information and support as you craft your way to completing this beautiful cowl. 

Materials

Materials

HiKoo® Concentric

MC - 1 cake

CC - 1 cake

Finished Size

9.25" high

54" circumference

Needles

addi®  US 7 (4.50mm) 32” (80cm) long circular needle, or size needed to obtain gauge.

Gauge

22 sts and 24 rounds

= 4” in pattern after steam blocking

Notions

Yarn

Fiber Content

100% Baby Alpaca

Yardage / Weight

437 yards

per 200 gram cake

Gauge

5 stitches per inch

US 8 (5.00 mm) needles

Care Instructions

Hand wash, dry flat